Concert Review – The Stumble

Review and photos by Ben Macnair

With a brand new album The Other Side just out, the six piece Blues, soul and rock band The Stumble were keen to showcase their new material and gems from their back catalogue when they returned to play for an enthusiastic Lichfield audience.

The Stumble

With a sound that mixed rock, blues, soul, and jazz, placed a strong emphasis on musicianship and a good beat, the ensemble of vocalist Paul Melville, guitarists Colin Black and Ant Scapens, saxophonist Simon Anthony Dixon, drummer and songwriter Boyd Tonnor, and bassist Cameron Sweetnam, the band meant serious business from the start.

The Stumble

With plenty of scope for improvisation, and three soloists, as well as the part Paul Rodgers part early Rod Stewart vocals of Paul Melville they packed plenty of genres and sounds into their two hour sets.

The Stumble

The first half featured many songs from their new release, whilst the second half featured music from their previous three releases. Songs such as Just Stop or Never Let You Go were blues rock, whilst New Orleans and Just a Little took more from rock and roll and jump jive music, with their rick saxophone inflections and rhythmic dynamism.

The Stumble

The unison guitar and saxophone guitar lines that have become something of a trademark for the band were all over the fun rock of Lie To Me and The Hougan, and things were radically slowed down for the slow blues of Jumping Of The Loving Train, which gave showcases to the talents of Ant Scapens and Simon Anthony Dixon.

The Stumble

The pace picked up for the jump jazz of Bus Stop, but slowed down again for the 12 bar The World is Tough, whilst It’s My Life started slowly, but after a false stop built up a head steam as the song went by.

A cover of Sam Cooke’s Bring It On Home To Me ended the concert, which saw the audience singing along.

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